Managing for Ethics and Social Responsibility Response Questions

RQ #1: “Managing for Ethics and Social Responsibility in a Global Environment” by Linda K. Trevino, ‎Katherine A. Nelson #

In chapter 11 “Managing for Ethics and Social Responsibility in a Global Environment” authors explain power distance “Power distance represents the extent to which people in the society accept a hierarchical or unequal distribution of power in their organization and in society” (p.403).

It makes me wonder whether the racial divide in society is some sort of power distance in which we accept the supremacy or inferiority of one race over others.

Are the patterns of racism similar to power distance in an organization? How title, race, and status are important in our society? How the power distance is reflected at the individual and organizational levels?

RQ #2: “Managing for Ethics and Social Responsibility in a Global Environment” by Linda K. Trevino, ‎Katherine A. Nelson #

Chapter 11 “Managing for Ethics and Social Responsibility in a Global Environment” authors contend that “Even in the most corrupt environments if you ask people what they value they’ll say that they value honesty and would prefer to live in a less corrupt environment” (p.411).

What are some of the ethical values which are accepted in all cultures? Does the meaning of these ethical values also remain the same in a different culture?

I wonder whether the standards of honesty and goodwill are the same in all cultures or they change. What are the influences of specific cultural values on these ethical standards which are the same all over the world?

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